1. Lesson 28: Perspective Direction

      written by Ray Benefield
      I told you posting was going to slow down when Reach came out right? Anyways I'm still hard at work finishing up content for you guys. I believe Inception is about ready to be published so expect that within the next few days, it is a crazy optical illusion that gives you the impression of a map that is massive and never ending. My BTB map Helix is currently in playtesting. Right now I am in the process of fully redesigning the bases to improve gameplay. If you haven't playtested it yet with me then you are really missing out peepz. Just send me a msg and I will try to get you in on a game. If I forget remember to remind me. I'm a busy guy and very forgetful. Anyways, it seems that a few people are interested in helping out with the Request Help section and writing for RP so I will start talking to you guys and getting you setup to help out. Expect me to talk to you or remind me to talk to you... lol. Today's lesson is back on track to level design. I'm not done with the advertising aspect, but I needed to feed my level design side. Next lesson is Saturday/Sunday. Also I keep intending to start that common forge question series. I will keep trying to gather the motivation... lol. Until I do check out TheArdly's blog of technical forge stuff. He has a tag chart, and several other guides that may help you out if you are having issues. Laterz for now peepz.




      Are you still having problems getting players to find the incentives that you have placed around the map? Do players just walk past weapons laying around the map despite the eye catching techniques you used to draw attention to them? There’s more to getting people to notice things than just using color contrast. Have you ever thought about their attention being drawn elsewhere in that situation?


      Point of Focus


      When in a combat situation players are constantly maneuvering their focus to things that they feel require their attention at the time. If someone is shooting at them then their attention is drawn to that deterrent, not the weapon lying on the ground beside them. If the capture the flag waypoint is straight across the map then their attention is going to be towards the shortest path to get to it, not the sniper rifle that is sitting comfortably in a cupboard behind them. If there is a rocket launcher sitting high up on a pedestal with lights shining all over it they aren’t going to notice the hidden shortcut that is off to the side out of their view.


      Standing in their shoes


      When trying to draw attention to something think about the most likely places that a player is going to be; whether it is coming in through a doorway, hiding behind cover, or sitting at a control point. Now imagine the player’s current priorities and where their point of focus is; this could be any possible threats, any obvious incentives, the next objective, etc. Now in your mind draw a sample of their possible perspective based on their focus point and position. Use that as a guideline as to what the player is looking at. Place what you are trying to draw attention to in that perspective keeping in mind the rule of thirds, color contrast, and other eye catching techniques. If you know a player is moving around a lot, keep in mind the possible perspective variance and plan accordingly. This technique can be used in a variety of ways. You can use it for area introduction, deterrent warnings, incentive presentation, and other such instances. This is similar to the way that you setup spawn perspectives except that a spawn perspectives direction is always known. Perspective direction is about making an educated guess and imagining yourself as a player, not as the designer.


      A third dimension


      When considering a player’s perspective direction it is easy to keep in mind that they can be focused anywhere in front of them, behind them, or to either side of them. Most designers forget that there is a third dimension in most games. Imagine a ramp. If a player is sitting at the bottom of the ramp and their path map reads that they are likely to be going forward over that ramp where is the player’s focus point? It isn’t straight ahead because then their perspective is filled with the ramp. Their perspective direction is towards the area of highest possible threat. When sitting at the base of a ramp that area is typically the very top of the ramp. So placing an incentive at the very bottom of the ramp is probably not a good idea as it is out of the player’s perspective. Always put yourself in your player’s shoes. Remember that they don’t know your map like you do. So show them. See your creation from their eyes, not from yours.


      6 comments:

      The_Ardly374 said...

      Thanks Mr. Gawdly. You're my hero, keep writing map...stuff.

      SmartAlec13 said...

      This is a good lesson. I judge forge competitions in a group that I am in on bungie.net, and this is a problem in many of the maps. The weapons are usually in poorly placed spots that players wont find unless they have previously played the map many times

      Hiyaaa96 said...

      I haven't found much time to comment recently, but i read a lot of your stuff and it helps

      Ardly374 said...

      Next time, link to the group, not the site that everyone knows. It would help.

      SmartAlec13 said...

      My purpose was not to link, it automatically created a link.

      IxFlashPointxI said...

      Godly, I have been keeping up with RP but I didn't find it necessary to post on the already discussed.

      Anyways, great lesson. This is always a problem especially with Asymmetrical maps because you never will know where a player might be, they could be at rockets, hidden in a tree, or even be behind the enemy spawn....

      I would post more but I got to go...